Babywearing is Safe

by Chrystal Johnson on March 19, 2010

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Babywearing is safe if done properly. That’s why the wording in the statement that came from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission irritates me so much. It’s very brief and doesn’t completely explain the full issue. Here’s the statement if you haven’t seen it:

“The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is warning parents and caregivers to use extra caution when carrying infants younger than 4 months old in slings and make sure that an infant’s face is visible to baby wearers at all times.

When researching incident reports of sling use for the past 20 years, CPSC identified at least 14 babies who died since 1998 inside sling-style infant carriers. Three of those deaths were in 2009.

In the first few months of life, babies cannot control their heads because of weak neck muscles. When they are placed with their faces below the rim of a sling, they are not able to lift their heads to breathe. This can lead to two hazardous situations.

First, one particular risk occurs when the baby’s head is turned toward the adult. An infant’s nose and mouth can be pressed against the carrier and become blocked, preventing the baby from breathing. Suffocation can happen quickly, within a minute or two.

Second, when a baby lies in a sling, the fabric can push the baby’s head forward to its chest. Infants can’t lift their heads and free themselves to breathe. This curled, chin-to-chest position can partially restrict a baby’s airways, causing a baby to lose consciousness. The baby cannot cry out for help.”

In our culture of, “if it bleeds, it leads,” everyone jumped on the bandwagon… and suddenly it was all over the media that slings aren’t safe. And that translated into Babywearing isn’t safe. Which just isn’t true.

First, you should be aware that this warning really applies to “bag slings” like the Infantino Slingrider. A bag sling is a type of baby carrier where the baby lays in a C-like position and rides low on the parent, like how a purse or bag is worn (see picture at right).

Because the baby is worn low, it’s difficult for you to monitor your baby or be conscious of them. Bag slings are also dangerous because the baby is carried in a C-like position and the baby’s chin is pressed against his or her chest, which constricts breathing and can cause suffocation.

Second, 14 babies in 20 years? Really? While I would be absolutely devastated if I was one of those 14 families, many more babies die from other devices being used improperly. How many babies have died or been seriously injured because their car seat wasn’t installed properly? The point is, you need to be aware of and follow safety guidelines for any device you’re using with your baby.

Women have been using baby carriers safely for centuries. But that doesn’t mean that you can just plop your baby in a carrier and then ignore them. You should always be conscious of and connected to your baby. Babywearing is all about being closer to your baby.

While I’ve never been a sling wearer (I prefer wraps), I know many women who are. And they are all conscious of their babies and use the slings as they were intended. You can use a sling safely, but I would absolutely avoid the “bag slings” anyhow because their design is inherently unsafe (see tips below for selecting a safe baby carrier) and they don’t give you the full benefits of babywearing.

I’m not the only one upset by the wording in this statement. Several baby carrier manufacturers (including Hotslings, Maya Wrap, Moby Wrap, Wrapsody, Gypsymama, Together Be, Kangaroo Korner, Taylormade Slings, Scootababy, Bellala Baby, Catbird Baby, SlingEZee, ZoloWear, HAVA, SlingRings and Sakura Bloom) came together to put out this release. It gives a much better overview of the issue.

So if you’re new to babywearing, don’t shy away simply because of this one statement by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Get the facts and select a baby carrier that is safe and you feel comfortable with.

A few tips to help you select a safe baby carrier:

  1. Baby should be close enough to kiss.
  2. Baby should never have his chin resting on his chest.
  3. Baby’s head should be above the rest of her body.
  4. Baby’s knees should be higher than his butt.
  5. Baby’s face shouldn’t be covered by fabric.
  6. Baby’s head should be supported.

While these tips are valuable, a great resource for learning more about safe babywearing is thebabywearer.com.

How did the statement from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission make you feel?

About Chrystal Johnson

Chrystal, publisher of Happy Mothering, is a mother of two sweet girls who believes in living a simple, natural lifestyle. A former marketing manager, Chrystal spends her time researching green and eco-friendly alternatives to improve her family's life. She enjoys sharing those discoveries with anyone who's willing to listen.

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Dionna @ Code Name: Mama March 19, 2010 at 11:35 am

Very informative – shared on my FB page! I wish I would have read this yesterday – we were at the zoo and a mama asked me about carriers. I hadn’t read the original article and so couldn’t tell her which carrier it referred to.

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2 Chrystal @ Happy Mothering March 19, 2010 at 2:20 pm

Thanks Dionna! Too bad I didn’t post it earlier in the week :-)

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3 Heather March 19, 2010 at 9:29 pm

Hello! I’m your 100th follower! I’m following from FFF at MBC. Nice to meet you! Hope you get a chance to stop by for a visit!
http://militaryspouserollercoasterride.blogspot.com/

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4 Eloise C March 20, 2010 at 11:41 am

What wonderful information, thanks so much for sharing! I am your new follower via FFF at Mom Bloggers Club. I look forward to reading more from your great blog. Have a wonderful weekend!
Eloise
Mommy2TwoGirls
http://mommy2twogirls.blogspot.com/

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5 Stephanie March 21, 2010 at 2:54 am

This is a great, great post!
I was frustrated by the CPSC’s comments (and more so by the media’s hype about it). I am so sad for those mamas and papas, but it seems to be more of a user error issue than an issue with the baby carriers themselves (except for the one with the faulty clip/ring).

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6 Francine Sanchez March 21, 2010 at 3:45 am

This is an excellent article!!
I’ve come over from MBC enter giveaways club.
I entered your moby wrap giveaway (a lot of entries) :)
Enter back on some of my giveaways and I will be much appreciative!
Adorable Scrabble Wine Charms
http://jotgiveaways.blogspot.com/2010/03/b-bye-butterfly-wine-charm-giveaway.html

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7 Joy March 21, 2010 at 4:04 am

Thanks for this informative post. I think slings can be wonderful things if used correctly. Since my daughter was born (2 years ago) her crib, stroller, and high chair have all been recalled. I am now following from MBC.

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8 Prakash March 21, 2010 at 4:59 am

Really informative blog post for parents like me.
Im following you both on google friend connect and networked blogs

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9 Vavrenyukfamily.blogspot.com March 23, 2010 at 1:36 am

I recently purchased the Infantino Sling Rider and after reading this, I am not going to use it! I am not due for 2 more days, so I have not had the chance to try it with my child. I did purchase the Moby Wrap and feel a lot more comfortable using that product instead. Thanks for posting information regarding safety of products. Always helpful to a new Mom!!

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10 babyhawk March 23, 2010 at 12:00 pm

Hello! I’m your 130th follower! I’m following from FFF at MBC. Nice to meet you! Hope you get a chance to stop by for a visit!

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11 Chrystal @ Happy Mothering March 23, 2010 at 9:33 pm

Stephanie – I totally agree with you
Vavrenyukfamily – I’m glad that you saw this before using it! The Moby is awesome, especially for newborns. There is a bit of a learning curve, but once you get it down, you’ll love it.
Thanks to everyone else visiting from MBC.

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